FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Haddington Road Agreement

Last updated 19th February 2014

ASK A QUESTION

If your question is not covered in this document, you can put your question to IMPACT by emailing info@impact.ie.

STATUS OF THE AGREEMENT

What’s the status of the Haddington Road Agreement?

The Haddington Road Agreement (HRA) is the outcome of negotiations  between public service management and unions, which took place in May 2013 under the auspices of the Labour Relations Commission (LRC). The negotiations were mainly with individual unions, although groups of unions were involved in talks on issues that affect members of more than one union.

The HRA package now exists as a collective agreement, which virtually all public service unions have signed up to. No union is bound by the agreement unless it decides to sign up, but unions that don’t sign up do not have the protections of the HRA or the original Croke Park agreement (eg, on compulsory redundancies, redeployment limits, outsourcing and many other issues).

The Oireachtas has also passed legislation (the Financial Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act, 2013), which contains far-reaching changes to pay and working conditions for members of unions that have not signed up to the HRA. The legislation also allows the Minister for Public Expenditure and Reform to impose other changes to working conditions by ministerial order.

While the HRA includes many difficult and unpalatable changes, members of unions who have signed up to the agreement will avoid the deeper cuts to pay and conditions set out in the legislation. They will also benefit from the various side-letters agreed during the negotiations that took place in the first half of 2013.

The HRA (and related Croke Park measures) are in place until the end of June 2016.

The status of the Croke Park agreement and the LRC ‘Croke Park 2’ proposals

All the measures, protections and procedures in the original Croke Park agreement (signed in 2010) remain in force, except where they have been explicitly changed by the Haddington Road Agreement (HRA). The Croke Park protections and procedures are now in force until the HRA expires in 2016.

Will the Government seek further changes to pay and conditions?

The agreement explicitly says that “that public service pay and related issues will not be revisited over the lifetime of this agreement,” which expires at the end of June 2016. Government ministers have repeatedly said that this will be the ‘final ask’ of public servants in the lifetime of this Government. In other words, they say they will not seek further changes to public service pay and conditions of public servants whose unions have accepted the HRA. The agreement says the Government would seek to engage with unions if a further serious economic downturn occurred, but this is not expected to happen.

What’s in the Financial Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act, 2013?

The primary purpose of the Act is to achieve savings of €1 billion in the public service pay and pensions bill by 2015 through a variety of measures. These include:

  • A reduction in pay rates for public servants who earn over €65,000
  • A reduction in the pensions of public service pensioners above a threshold of €32,500
  • Suspension of incremental progression for three years for all public servants, unless they are covered by a collective agreement registered with the Labour Relations Commission (in practice, the Haddington Road Agreement)
  • Clarification of the existing legal position that ministers and other bodies can set terms and conditions of employment including pay reductions or increases in working time.

Unions like IMPACT, which have signed up to the Haddington Road Agreements, are exempt from the harsher terms set out in the Financial Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act.

PAY

Does the agreement cut my pay?

No public servant who earns under €65,000 a year will see a cut in their core pay – that’s 87% of public servants.

What if I earn over €65,000?

Management’s opening position was that it wanted a straight cut to pay scales for those earning €60,000 “if not lower.” Unions worked to increase this threshold, minimise the reductions, and create a clear path to restore pay for everyone who earns less than €100,000 a year (see below). The outcome is:

  • If your salary is between €65,000 and €80,000 a year (including allowances in the nature of pay), your total remuneration is reduced by 5.5%. But your salary will not fall below €65,000.
  • Earnings (including allowances in the nature of pay) between €80,000 and €150,000 are reduced by 8%
  • Earnings (including allowances in the nature of pay) between €150,000 and €185,000 are reduced by 9%
  • Earnings (including allowances in the nature of pay) over €185,000 are reduced by 10%.

So, for example if you earn €85,000:

  • The 5.5% cut applies to your entire earnings up to €80,000.
  • The 8% reduction only applies to your earnings above €80,000.

The salaries of staff who work less than full-time hours (job sharers, part-time workers, etc) in grades where the full-time salary is over €65,000 are adjusted on a pro-rata basis.

When did the pay reductions take effect?

Pay reductions for those earning over €65,000 happened on 1st July 2013.

If I earned more than €65,000 before 1st July 2013, can my pay fall below €65,000?

No. The figure of €65,000 is both a threshold and a floor. No public servant sees their pay reduced to below €65,000 as a result of the agreement.

Will my pay be restored over time?

Staff who earn between €65,000 and just above €100,000 a year (including allowances in the nature of pay) will be returned to their June 2013 pay rates over time. This will happen in the following way:

  • For those on salaries (inclusive of allowances in the nature of pay) between €65,000 and the maximum of the civil service principal (higher) scale (or public service equivalent) of just over €100,000, the reduction in pay will be restored in two equal phases – the first on 1st April 2017 and the second nine months later.
  • Salaries scales above the maximum of the civil service principal (higher) scale (or public service equivalent) will be permanently reduced by the appropriate percentage, based on the application of the reductions above.

What if my pay was cut from a long service increment (LSI) point?

When pay begins to be restored, account will be taken of time served on pre-reduction scale points. In other words, you will not have to work an additional three years to regain your LSI point.

PENSIONS

If I earn under €65,000, does the pay reduction affect my pension?

No.

If I earn over €65,000, how does the pay reduction affect my pension?

In summary:

  • If you retire before August 2014, your gross pay and lump sum will be unaffected.
  • If you retire after August 2014, but before full restoration of pay, your pension and lump sum will be reduced because it will be based on your pay rate at the time of retirement. This is referred to as the ‘grace period’.
  • Pensions of €32,500 or more have been reduced by legislation (see below).

The Government has applied a further ‘grace period’ within which the pay reductions (and any deferral of increment) will not impact on superannuation calculations. However, pensions greater than €32,500 awarded during this grace period will be subject to a special new Public Service Pension Reduction (see below). These grace period and PSPR provisions are set out in the Financial Emergency Measures in the Public Interest Act 2013, which also permits the Minister to extend the grace period by order. IMPACT and other public service unions have asked the Minister to consider extending the grace period beyond August 2014.

Unless the minister decides to extend the grace period, those who retire after 31st August 2014 will have their superannuation benefits calculated by reference to their pay rate at retirement, i.e. inclusive of the pay reduction. It will be a matter for the Government of the day to determine how and when public service pensions in payment may be adjusted.

What is the Public Service Pension Reduction (PSPR)?

The Public Service Pension Reduction (PSPR) is a tiered reduction of public service pensions above €12,000 which has been in place since 1st January 2011.

I retired before end-February 2012 on a pension of more than €32,500. How am I affected?

With effect from 1st July 2013, pensions were reduced by way of an increase in the PSPR (Public Service Pension Reduction), which was applied to pensions in payment above €32,500.

I retired after February 2012. How is my pension affected?

A separate and lower PSPR rate will be applied to those who retired on pensions above €32,500 since 1st March 2012. This is lower than the previous PSPR to take account of the fact that these pensions are based on already reduced pay rates.

I intend to retire after 1st July 2013 but before end-August 2014. How will my pension payment be affected?

Public servants who retire before the end of August, 2014 will have their pension and lump sum calculated by reference to pre-1st July 2013 pay rates (ie, before the pay reductions). Those on pensions above €32,500 will have their pension reduced by the new PSPR rate, but their pension lump sum will be unaffected.

INCREMENTS

Are my increments frozen?

Management wanted to freeze all increments until the end of 2016, but unions negotiated a better outcome. In summary:

  • Public servants who earn less than €35,000 a year receive their next increment when it falls due and then wait 15 months (rather than 12) before any following increment is paid.
  • Public servants who earn between €35,000 and €65,000 receive their next increment when it falls due, then wait 15 months (rather than 12) before any following increment is paid, and then 15 months (rather than 12) before the following increment is paid.
  • Public servants who earn between €35,000 and €65,000 a year, and who are now at the top of their scale, forfeit six days leave, or the cash equivalent. This is not a permanent reduction in annual leave entitlement; it’s a once-off loss of six day’s leave spread over a three year period.
  • Public servants who earn between €35,000 and €65,000, and reach the top of the scale following a second increment paid during the lifetime of the agreement, incur a once-off loss of three days leave or the cash equivalent. This is not a permanent loss of leave.
  • Those on salaries (inclusive of allowances in the nature of pay) between €65,000 and the maximum of the civil service principal (higher) scale (or public service equivalent) of just over €100,000, receive their next increment when it falls due, then wait 18 months (rather than 12) before any following increment is paid, and then 18 months (rather than 12) before the next increment is paid.
  • Incremental progression is suspended for three years for those on salaries scales starting over €100,000 (inclusive of allowances in the nature of pay).

How is the cash equivalent of lost leave calculated?

Updated: Wednesday 19th February 2014

If you opt to pay the cash equivalent rather than lose leave, the deduction is the gross pay value of either your six leave days or half your most recent increment (whichever is the lesser) minus a reduction of 62%. The 62% reduction reflects the value of tax and other deductions from gross pay.

Staff who earn between €35,000 and €65,000, and reach the top of the scale following a second increment paid during the lifetime of the agreement, must incur a once-off loss of three days leave or the cash equivalent. They will now be subject to the same formula for calculating the cash equivalent. The method for conceding leave is set out in a Department of Public Expenditure and Reform circular, which includes pro-rata arrangements for staff who reach their salary maximum in the period 2013–2016. (Note the examples used in this DEPR circular relate directly to civil service grades only and do not encompass clerical staff in the wider public service).

Is my pension affected if I choose the cash equivalent?

No.

Does the ‘top of the scale’ include or exclude long service increments?

For the purposes of this agreement, ‘top of the scale’ includes long service increments. That’s because the purpose of this measure is to ensure that the value of the delay in paying increments also applies to staff who have no more increments due to them.

What happens to staff awaiting a long service increment?

If you earn between €35,000 and €65,000 and your next increment is your first long service increment you will receive the increment on the normal date, but your next long service increment will be deferred by a period of six months.

If you earn between €35,000 and €65,000 and are already on your first long service increment, you will receive your next long service increment on the normal date. The provisions about forfeiting annual leave (or the cash equivalent) on a once-off basis will apply to you on at a pro-rata basis, with the amount of leave or cash forfeit dependent on when you achieve the long-service increment. Note: This is not a permanent reduction in annual leave entitlement – it is a once-off loss over the lifetime of the agreement.

What happens if my salary moves from below to above €35,000 during the lifetime of the agreement?

If your salary goes above €35,000 during the lifetime of the agreement – whether by promotion or incremental progression – you will be liable for one three-month increment delay (see above).

What happens if my salary moves from below to above €65,000 during the lifetime of the agreement?

Once your pay (including allowances in the nature of pay) goes above €65,000, your incremental progression will be in accordance with the arrangements for that salary range (see above).

How will the increment changes be applied to job-shares and part-time workers?

The duration of the delay in increment payments (one three-month delay for staff on full-time earnings under €35,000, and two three-month delays for staff with full-time earnings between €35,000 and €65,000) applies to job-sharers and part-time workers at the top of the scale on a pro-rata basis (pro-rata to the equivalent full-time worker). This is not a permanent reduction in annual leave entitlement – it is a once-off loss of leave spread over a three year period.

What if I already have low annual leave entitlements?

IMPACT has ensured that staff with low levels of annual leave (23 days or below), and who are on the maximum of their salary scales, will not lose annual leave in lieu of the temporary changes to increments for staff who earn between €35,000 and €65,000.

 

PREMIUM PAYMENTS AND OVERTIME

What are the changes to overtime payments?

Management wanted all overtime to be worked at a flat rate – in other words, at the standard hourly pay rate. Unions negotiated a better outcome, which is:

  • Public servants who earn less than €35,000 a year will be paid overtime at 1.5 times the minimum point of their scale. (A small number of staff in this category, who would be disproportionately hit by this formula, will be paid overtime at time-and-a-quarter of their individual scale point).
  • Public servants who earn more than €35,000 will be paid overtime at 1.25 times the actual point of their scale, subject to any ceilings in place.
  • If they work overtime, staff who currently work 39 hours a week will have to work one unpaid hour a week. This requirement will expire on 31st March 2014.
  • Double time will continue to be paid for Saturday afternoon and Sundays and public holidays.

Are there changes to Saturday premium payments?

No. Where they exist, premium payments for working Saturdays are unchanged.

Are there changes to ‘twilight’ premium payments?

Where they exist, twilight payments for working between 6-8pm will be abolished. The Department of Public of Expenditure and Reform has confirmed that hours currently paid at time-plus-one-sixth after 8pm will continue to be paid at this rate.

 

ALLOWANCES

Will there be changes to my allowances?

There is no significant change to the existing situation regarding allowances paid to IMPACT members. The agreement commits unions and management to continue to cooperate with the Government’s allowances review. It says the parties should take account of a recent Labour Court recommendation on the issue with a view to reaching agreement on compensation in situations where pensionable allowances are eliminated in future.

What about allowances for service officers in the civil service?

Late in 2012, IMPACT’s FGE branch and the Department of Public Expenditure and Reform agreed that the service officer grade pay structure should be reconfigured because take-home pay relies too heavily on allowances and overtime. The objective is to deal with the effect of over-reliance on overtime and allowances within a review of core pay. It is not about cutting pay or allowances. IMPACT received a ‘side letter’ on 27th February 2013, which confirmed this review of service officer pay structures. The union is prioritising this review as, otherwise, changes in how overtime is calculated would have a significant and disproportionate effect on these grades. One of the objectives of the review is to avoid this. The discussions are ongoing and are scheduled to conclude by the end of 2013.

 

PENSION LEVY

What is the change to the pension levy?

IMPACT successfully sought an adjustment to the so-called ‘pension levy’ to exempt more earnings from the levy. This will be done (through legislation) by halving the ‘pension levy’ rate of 5% on earnings between €15,000 and €20,000. It’s worth a net €125 a year to all public servants, and it will be effective from 1at January 2014.

END OF TWO-TIER PAY SCALES

What does the ‘end of ‘two-tier’ pay scales mean?

The previous Government imposed new pay scales for new entrants, which were 10% less than the standard scale at every point. This established a permanent ‘two-tier workforce’ where staff doing the same work would have substantially different pay. The Haddington Road agreement ends the ‘two-tier’ pay scales.

New unified pay scales will see post-2011 entrants ascend to pre-2011 scale points after two years, or less in some cases. As a result, most staff recruited after January 2011 will be earning more than their current scale allows once they reach their third scale point. They will then ascend the same pre-2011 incremental pay scales as everyone else in their grade.

As a result, all staff in any given grade will be on common pre-2011 pay scales, albeit with up to two additional post-2011 points added at the bottom of the scales. The changes apply to all staff who joined the civil and public service after January 2011, including those already in post. There is no change for staff already on pre-2011 pay scales.

WORKING HOURS

Has my working time been increased?

In summary:

  • Working time has been increased, but not by as much as management originally proposed (which was five extra hours a week for everyone).
  • The standard full-time working week is now 37 hours for staff who currently work 35 hours or less.
  • No individual (on grade VII, or equivalent, or below) has seen their working hours increase more than two hours and 15 minutes. This arrangement is on a personal to holder basis and does not apply to new recruits or promoted staff, who will have a standard 37-hour week.
  • However, there is now a minimum working week of 35 hours. In the few cases where, prior to July 2013, full-time staff worked less than 32 hours and 45 minutes, working time will increase by two hours and 15 minutes, and then to 35 hours a week in 2015.
  • For local authority staff, the maximum increase of two hours and 15 minutes includes increases in working time that came into effect in March 2013 on foot of a Labour Court recommendation under the original Croke Park deal. In other words, the additional two hours and 15 minutes will be calculated from your working time on 28th February 2013.
  • Staff above grade VII now have a standard 37-hour week.
  • Job sharers and part-time staff see their hours increased on a pro-rata basis.
  • Local discussions determined how the increased hours are applied.
  • The divisor for overtime calculations is now be based on 37 hours and overtime rates are not payable until more than 37 hours have been worked.
  • These arrangements will be reviewed before the end of the agreement.
  • Where organisations are merged or restructured, the issue of standardised working hours will be addressed in direct discussions between unions and management. If agreement cannot be reached, the issue will go to binding arbitration under procedures in the original Croke Park agreement and the recent local authority Labour Court recommendation (LCR 20366).
  • Staff who already worked more than 35 hours a week prior to July 2013 see their working hours increase to 39 hours a week. In most cases, this will be an increase of 1.5 hours as most staff in this category worked 37.5 hours a week prior to July 2013.
  • Staff who worked 39 hours a week prior to July 2013 see no change in their working hours. However, if they work overtime, one hour of overtime per week will be unpaid until 31st March 2014.
  • There is no specific change to potential weekly working hours for special needs assistants, who saw their working time increased by two hours a week under the original Croke Park agreement. There will be a Labour Relations Commission review of these additional hours to see if they are being used “in the most effective and appropriate manner.”
Current hours New hours
32.5 35*
32.75 35
33 35.25
33.5 35.75
34 36.25
34.75 37
35 37
37.5 39
*An initial two hours and 15 minute increase, with the balance effective in 2015. New hours effective from 1st July 2013 subject to local consultation on implementation.

When did the working time changes come into effect?

From 1st July 2013, subject to local discussions on the application of increased working hours.

What if my circumstances mean I’m unable to work additional time?

Staff have the option of remaining on their pre-July 2013 hours with a pro-rata pay adjustment to reflect the value of the extra working time. Management conceded this “for a period.” That means that staff who exercise this option do not have to do so forever. So, if their circumstances change, they can opt to go to the increased hours and have their pay readjusted to reflect this. It also allows management to review the arrangements over time, following negotiations with the unions. It was agreed that this review will take place in 2014.

What if management refuses me the option to remain on my pre-July 2013 hours?

Some public service managements (notably the HSE) say they can withdraw the option to opt for a pay reduction and remain on pre-July 2013 hours. IMPACT rejects this position and has raised it in the Haddington Road implementation fora. In some cases it is likely that this issue will end up in arbitration and you should watch the IMPACT website and ebulletins for developments.

What is meant by “a minimum 37 hour week”?

Individuals who worked 35 hours a week or less (full time hours) before July 2013 now have increased working hours. But, on a ‘personal to holder’ basis, they do not have to work more than 37 hours. The reference to a “minimum” 37-hour week in the agreement means that 37 hours has become the minimum full-time working week in the public service except for staff with personal to holder arrangements.

How does the working hours increase affect part-timers and job sharers?

Staff who work less than full-time hours (job sharers, part-time workers, etc) have their hours changed on a pro-rata basis.

How do the working hours changes affect special needs assistants?

There is no specific change to potential weekly working hours for special needs assistants, who saw their working time liability increased by two hours a week under the original Croke Park agreement. There will be a Labour Relations Commission review of these additional hours to see if they are being used “in the most effective and appropriate manner.”

What if I currently get carers’ allowance?

If you receive carers’ allowance you have the option of remaining on your pre-July 2013 hours with a pay adjustment to reflect the extra working time introduced by the Haddington Road agreement. This means you can stay on your existing hours and remain eligible for carers’ allowance.

How will the additional hours be applied?

The changes came into force on 1st July 2013. Those full-time staff whose hours increased by more than two and a quarter hours (ie, those who worked fewer than 32 and three- quarter hours, or those above grade VII who worked less than 34 and three-quarter hours, prior to July 2013) saw their hours increased by two and a quarter hours from July 2013. The remaining increase in hours will be implemented by 1st January 2015.

The agreement says there will be detailed consultation about the implementation of the working time changes at workplace level “in order to maximise the capacity to accommodate issues for affected individuals.”

What if my working time increased to 34 hours a week in March 2013?

For local authority staff covered by the Labour Court recommendation (LRC20366), which increased working time, the additional two hours and 15 minutes include any additional time worked since 1st March 2013. In other words, the additional two hours and 15 minutes are calculated from your working time on 28th February 2013.

Do I get extra pay for working additional hours?

No.

Is my annual leave entitlement affected?

No. There is no reduction in annual leave.

Is my sick leave affected?

No. There is no additional change to sick leave entitlements under the Haddington Road agreement. However, changes to certified sick leave arrangements are going to be implemented from January 2014 on foot of a Labour Court recommendation under the original Croke Park agreement.

Is my parental leave entitlement affected?

No. There is no change to parental leave arrangements. Where the length of the working week or day is increased, the length of a parental leave day will increase along with the increase in the length of the working week or day. The net effect will be that those entitled to parental leave will be entitled to the same day/week’s leave as before.

FLEXITIME

Do I lose access to flexitime?

Existing staff have retained their flexitime arrangements on a personal to holder basis.

Flexitime continues to be available to new and promoted staff at the level of (civil service) higher executive officer and below. Higher executive officer is equivalent to grade VII in health, local authorities and education.

Flexitime is not now available for new and promoted staff at the level of (civil service) assistant principal officer. Assistant principal officer is equivalent to grade VIII in health and senior executive officer in local authorities.

From 1st July 2014, the maximum amount of flexi-leave allowed in any flexi-period is one day. There are no changes to the amount of hours that can be carried over from one flexi-period to another.

Will I get fewer flexi days?

The maximum amount of flexi leave allowed in any flexi period will be one day effective from 1st July 2014.

Can I still carry flexi leave into the next period?

Yes, here is no change to the amount of time that can be carried over from one flexi-period to another.

How are technical and professional staff affected by the changes?

Flexitime arrangements have not changed for technical and professional grades who are analogous or linked to administrative grades III to VII (or higher executive officer in the civil service) and who currently have flexitime arrangements. Staff above that level have retained any pre-July 2013 arrangements on a personal to holder basis.

Have core time bands been changed?

Core time bands are not affected. However, each public service organisation is to consider whether there’s a need to change core flexi bands in light of the extended hours and “business requirements.” There will be local consultation on this.

PART TIME STAFF AND JOB SHARERS

What if I don’t work full-time?

Changes in working time for staff who work less than full-time hours are pro-rata. Any pay reductions are also pro rata.

How are the increment changes applied to job-sharers and part-time workers?

Job-sharers and part-time workers at the top of the scale lose leave days on a pro-rata basis to the equivalent full-time worker. This is not a permanent reduction in annual leave entitlement; it’s a once-off loss of leave spread over a three year period.

Do my work-sharing patterns change?

The agreement reiterates management’s existing right to approve, alter and standardise work-sharing patterns for staff who were recruited to a full-time positions and then opt to reduce their hours. It says that the range of work-sharing patterns will be reduced and that “no work-sharing pattern should be less than 50% of full-time working hours.” However, staff currently working less than 50% of full-time hours, are able to retain their current arrangements on a personal to holder basis.

What if I receive carers’ allowance?

You will not be compelled to increase your working hours beyond 15 hours a week.

What if I have a disability that limits the amount of hours I can do?

If your employer has reached a ‘reasonable accommodation’ with you to work less that 50% of full-time hours, the reasonable accommodation remains in place.

REDUNDANCY

Are compulsory redundancies allowed under the agreement?

No. Management sought a compulsory redundancy facility in certain redeployment situations but unions successfully resisted this.

Are voluntary redundancies allowed under the agreement?

The only change with regard to voluntary redundancy contained in the agreement relates to redeployment, where it says that “voluntary departure” may be appropriate in some circumstances. Although there is no general voluntary redundancy scheme, to which any public servant can apply, in place, management in various parts of the public service have introduce targeted voluntary redundancy schemes in specific situations from time to time. Standard redundancy terms have been agreed for such situations.

 

REDEPLOYMENT

Have the limits on redeployment changed?

No. The limit remains at 45 kilometres. The agreement introduced some changes to procedures for the redeployment of staff in the civil service and non-commercial semi-state bodies, and for cross-sectoral redeployments. New legislation will remove legal barriers to redeployment between different parts of the civil and public service. Appeals procedures will remain or will be put in place.

 

SPECIAL NEEDS ASSISTANTS: JOB SECURITY

Special needs assistants are to get more job security through the establishment of a redeployment panel on the basis of the Labour Court recommendation of June 2012. This is expected to be similar to the scheme that currently operates for teachers.

 

REGULARISATION OF ACTING POSITIONS

An existing Labour Relations Commission document on the regularisation of acting positions in health has been amended to remove the existing salary cap and is being implemented “in a cost neutral manner.”

Local authority management has accepted IMPACT’s argument that a regularisation of long-term acting posts must take place. Local authority management has confirmed to IMPACT that regularisation of medium- and long-term acting positions will be considered in conjunction with the ‘workforce planning’ process.

HEALTH SECTOR ISSUES

What is the change to the CORU fee (for registration of health professionals)?

The cost of statutory registration for social workers and other health professionals has been reduced from €295 a year to €100 a year until 2016, when it will be reviewed.

What’s the position on outsourcing of HR and payroll?

The Department of Health and Children has confirmed that “the concept of shared services will be the preferred option, eg in HR, payroll and other such areas.”

Annual leave in voluntary hospitals

IMPACT won a commitment that health management will re-engage with IMPACT no later than September 2013 on realigning annual leave in voluntary hospitals with the standardised HSE arrangements. If agreement is not reached within eight weeks, the matter is to go to the Labour Court where management has agreed that it will argue the case on its merits. Both parties have agreed that this will replace an existing claim that was heard by the Labour Court, which has not issued a recommendation on the matter.

In the meantime, voluntary hospital staff who have less than the HSE standardised leave, and who are on the maximum of their salary scale, do not lose annual leave in lieu of the temporary changes to increments for staff who earn between €35,000 and €65,000.

Sleepover arrangements

Health service management agreed with IMPACT that ongoing discussions on sleepover arrangements for social care workers in residential homes and disability settings would be completed no later than 31st December 2013. The talks are dealing with issues like the number and value of sleepovers, and employers’ compliance with the Organisation of Working Time Act. The talks broke down on 18th November 2013 and IMPACT has referred the matter to arbitration.

 

ASK A QUESTION

If your question is not covered in this document, you can put your question to IMPACT by emailing info@impact.ie.